Exploring Technological Tools
for Teaching and Learning

An Abbreviated WebQuest for University Faculty Exploration and Development

Designed by
Dr. Mark Bailey
Pacific University School of Education
baileym@pacificu.edu

Introduction | Task | Process | Evaluation | Conclusion | Credits and References|

WebQuest Resources |


Introduction

The objective of this abbreviated WebQuest is to introduce you to the broad range of technological tools appropriate for fostering learning in a variety of learning environments. A WebQuest is a effective tool for supporting this objective because you will be actively directing the focus of your exploration in ways that support your specific needs as an educator. Bernie Dodge describes a WebQuest as an" inquiry-oriented activity in which most or all of the information used by learners is drawn from the Web. WebQuests are designed to use learners’ time well, to focus on using information rather than looking for it, and to support learners’ thinking at the levels of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation." (http://edweb.sdsu.edu/webquest/overview.htm).

The essential question around which this quest is organized is: what are the pedagogically powerful technological tools that are appropriate for the subject matter in your discipline, that can meet your needs as an educator, and that will foster meaningful learning for your students?

During our all too short time together, I would like you to be able to:
1. Develop an over arching sense of the types of tools that are available and appropriate for supporting learning
2. Evaluate the utility of specific tools for the teaching and learning that you do
3. Locate a collection of useful links and resources that you will be able to explore later on your own,
4. Synthesize your understanding of these tools and their application, as you create a plan to integrate them into your work.
5. Become familiar with the use of a WebQuest as a learning and teaching tool.

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The Tasks

1. Please find one or two other individuals in the room who are either from a similar department or professional program and work with them to produce a Word document containing the following two elements:
--A. A list of links that you will spend time exploring on your own
--B. An outline of tools that might be useful for the teaching that you do
Please email yourself this document or save it on a disk for later use.

2. Throughout the process of exploring and evaluating these resources I would like you to discuss your ideas with your colleagues. Try to discuss which resources seem to be the best suited for the level of work you are doing, the nature of your disciplines, and the students with whom you will be working. Don't forget to address the motivational aspect of the use of these tools and the depth of learning that their use will foster.

3. After we are done today I encourage you to take some time on your own to access the materials that you put together for the purpose of creating a plan to move forward with your professional development. This Website and the resources it contains will remain accessible to you as you pursue this work.

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The Process

To complete this WebQuest, please follow the steps provided below.

1. First find one other person in the room with whom you have some common curricular interest or background.
2. Once you have found a partner please open a word document on your computer and save it on your desktop.
3. Please work with your partner to engage in a general review the different categories of technological tools.
4. Once you have completed a general review, please begin to investigate in greater detail those categories of tools that are the most relevant to you. Explore specific examples of their use and keep track of the links and resources that are relevent to each of you by dragging these links (or copying them) to your word document.
5. As you explore these resources, please discuss them with your partner, evaluating their quality, utility, and applicability.
6. As the last part of your work today, either save your word document to a disk or email it to each of your addresses as an attachment.
7. Finally, I encourage you to access this material at a later time in order to continue your work.

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Evaluation

For most WebQuests, an important component of the approach is a description of how the process and final product will be evaluated. I have included an example of a rubric template that would be used by the students to know what are relevent dimensions of assessment, and by the teacher as a means of evaluating student work.

Beginning

1

Developing

2

Accomplished

3

Exemplary

4

Score

 

Stated Objective or Performance

 

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting a beginning level of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting development and movement toward mastery of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting mastery of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting the highest level of performance.

 

Stated Objective or Performance

 

 

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting a beginning level of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting development and movement toward mastery of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting mastery of performance.
Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting the highest level of performance.

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Conclusion

A WebQuest can be a powerful tool for supporting student-centered learning. I have designed this abbreviated version to begin to introduce you to the process, and to allow you to actively explore a large collection of educational technological resources relevant to your work. This application of technology to learning is very constructivist in that it incorporates active learning, higher level objectives, collaborative construction of understanding, and utilizes scaffolding by the seminar facilitator. It is a means of walking the talk, while providing a rich collection of relevant resources for your use.



Credits & References

The Concept of a WebQuest was developed in early 1995 at San Diego State University by Bernie Dodge with Tom March. You can read the original paper, or view some of the really wonderful resources below.

The WebQuest Home page http://webquest.sdsu.edu/webquest.html
Webquest Reading and Training Materials http://webquest.sdsu.edu/materials.htm
WebQuests: A Strategy for Scaffolding Higher Level Learning by Bernie Dodge
Presented at NECC, June 22-24, 1998
http://webquest.sdsu.edu/necc98.htm
Why WebQuests?, an introduction
By Tom March
http://www.ozline.com/webquests/intro.html
WebQuest collection including university level Webquests http://edweb.sdsu.edu/webquest/webquest_collections.htm
ISTE Article, FOCUS: Five Rules for Writing a Great WebQuest
By Bernie Dodge
http://www.iste.org/L&L/archive/vol28/no8/featuredarticle/dodge/index.html
A WebQuest for teachers who want to integrate the internet into their curriculum http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Mouse/8059/CurriculumQuest.html
Adult Workshop on the development of WebQuests http://edweb.sdsu.edu/triton/july/workshop.html
ISTE Article, The Student WebQuest
By Maureen Brown Yoder
http://www.iste.org/L&L/archive/vol26/no7/features/yoder/index.html
The WebQuest Design Process
as used and developed by Tom March
http://www.ozline.com/webquests/design.html
Other Useful Resources
Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education
Oregon Technology in Education Network
North West Regional Educational Laboratories
North Central Regional Educational Laboratory
Apple Classroom Of Tomorrow
NASA Center for Ed Tech.
ISTE Teacher Resources l
ERIC Digests
Testimonial From Brown U.
Teaching with Electronic Tech.
Laptop Research
Speculative Tech Future Timeline
Technology Glossary
21st Century Teachers
The Digital Classroom
Pedagogical Papers
--Distributed Constructionism
--A Constructionist Learning Environment
--Best Practices in College Teaching
- Knowledge Quest on Web
- MIT epistomology and learning group
- Evaluation in Computer education
- Constructivist Pages

Last updated on Feb 22, 2002. Based on a template from The WebQuest Page